Judo Training Methods - A Sourcebook

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Author: Takahiko Ishikawa & Donn F. Draeger
Pub: 1961 by Charles E. Tuttle Co.
Pages: 324
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To the great delight of Judoka everywhere, this book was just re-released in paperback. If you haven't already picked it up, do it now before it goes out-of-print again. This is a very good book on training methods, weight training, and exercises specific to Judo. A great deal of historical information on the 'Maximum Efficiency with Minimum Effort' principle is detailed in the first chapter. Highly recommended!


                             Table of Contents

How to Use This Book ......................................................... 11
Authors' Foreword ............................................................ 13

                                      Part I: Principles
Chapter 1 PHYSICAL JUDO RE-EXAMINED .......................................... 19
Chapter 2 CLASSIFICATION OF EXERCISES AND MUSCLE GROUPS ...................... 27
Chapter 3 KINESIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES ABOUT MUSCLE ............................. 31
          Biological Design; Muscle Fiber and Strength; Muscle Contraction;
          How Muscles Grow; Muscle Speed and Reaction Time; Muscular
          activity During Movement; Functions of Muscles; Muscular Fatigue;
          Coordination and Skill; Kiai; Application.
Chapter 4 JUDO TRAINING ADVICE ............................................... 43
          Objectives and Purposes of Training; Principles of Learning; Sincerity
          in Training; Regularity of Training; Over Training; Under Training;
          Instructor Advice; Student Advice; Dojo Facilities; Dojo Etiquette,
          Awards Etiquette; Food and Sleep; Tobacco and Liquor; Age and
          Judo Practice; Use of the kodokan Emblem; Organizational Spirit;
          Cutting Weight; Injuries; Training Applications; Training Method-
          ology; Training Potpourri; The Judo Contest; Types of Judo Contests
          and Usage; Administration of Judo Contests and Tournaments; The
          Judo Tournament in Retrospect.
Chapter 5 JUDO AND WEIGHT TRAINING .......................................... 115
          Weight Lifting and Weight Training; Weight Training Systems;
          Weights and Myths; Physical Fitness; Benefits of Exercise; Is Weight
          Exercise Contrary to Kodokan Judo?; Outlook for Weight Training
          in Relation to Judo.
Chapter 6 JUDO TRAINING ROUTINES ............................................ 125
          The Judo Training Session; Weight Training Programs; Weight
          Exercises for Specific Judo Waza; Japanese Judo Champions' Statistics.

                              Part II: Practice
Chapter 7 PREPARATORY EXERCISES ............................................. 147
          Equipment: Application; Selection of exercises; Repetitions; Order of
          Exercises; Non-Judo exponents; Leg Group; Abdominal Belt Group;
          Upper Back-Neck Group; Shoulder-Chest-Arm Group.
Chapter 8 SUPPLEMENTARY EXERCISES ........................................... 177
          Equipment; Application; Selection of Exercises; Repetitions; Order of
          Exercises; Non-Judo Exponents; Body Turning; Leg Techniques;
          Waist Techniques; Hand Techniques.
Chapter 9 COMPOUND EXERCISES ................................................ 191
          Equipment; Application; Selection of Exercises; Repetitions; Order
          of Exercises; Non-Judo Exponents.
Chapter 10 AUXILIARY EXERCISES .............................................. 203
           Equipment; Application; Post Workout Shower or Bath; Muscular
           Soreness; Muscular Growth and Progress; Exercise Terminology;
           Exercise Potpourri; Non-Judo Exponents; Leg Group; Chest Group;
           Upper Back-Neck Group; Arm-Shoulder Group; Abdominal Belt
           Group; Power Group; Expander Exercises; Obi Exercises; Pulley
           Exercises.
Appendix .................................................................... 285
           World Judo Organization; USA Judo Organization; JBBF Organi-
           zational Diagram; List of USA Kodokan Judo Yudanshakai; JBBF
           Promotional Policy; JBBF Rank. and Belt Colors; Contest Rules of
           Kodokan Judo; The Go Kyo no waza; Sample. Constitution for Dojo;
           Requirements for Kodokan Male Dan Ranks; Requirements for
           Kodokan Male Kyu u Ranks; Shiai Record Forms.
Glossarv .................................................................... 309
Bibliography ................................................................ 315
Index ....................................................................... 317

 

THE PHYSICAL and mental benefits provided by constant Judo exercise are many and varied. Within these dimensions, countless books describe the performance of the techniques of Judo, but none specifically are devoted to the general principles of training. Yet, it is necessary to distinguish training methods from actual technique. The dual object of this book is to categorically compile and describe some of the traditional Judo exercises and training methods which have produced outstanding Judo exponents and champions, and to sensibly combine other exercises, outside the normal Judo realm, with these traditional movements with a view toward perfecting the anatomy of training and increasing Judo efficiency by scientific methods. Heretofore, all Judo exercises have been considered a more or less "dry" and uninteresting subject, having been empirical and casually recorded on the premise that Judo, idealistically, is a complete exercise in itself. The plain and simple facts are that neither excellence in Judo nor vibrant health can be nurtured without subsidiary exercise. The exercises described within these pages represent the product of a combined research period totaling about thirty years. The methods depicted are not exhaustive within their scope, but have been specially selected as those methods most adaptable to all persons practicing Judo and those non-Judo exponents interested in beneficial exercise to tone and maintain body health. All exercises are in concert with, and coterminous with Kodokan doctrine and are patterned under the well-known Judo slogan, "Maximum Efficiency" or "Best Use of Energy."

We are here concerned with the elements of physical Judo, especially the phases referred to as "contest" Judo preparation. This text includes a discussion of the valise, compatibility, and necessity for weight training exercises in developing and maintaining body health in serious Judo study. The exercises were carefully selected, based on research, and are clearly described to enhance correct performance. They have been somewhat scientifically arranged to provide necessary balance from a kinesiological standpoint, No system is as good as it could be... this is a truism. In Judo, veneration for the past and conservatism, of which it is a product, has had its progress inhibited by sole adherence to traditional training methods. If current "old fashioned" methods are held to, with no variance, there is little chance for advancement in knowledge or ability. We do not suggest that this attenuated progress reflects discredit on the basic values of Judo, but rather that a more dynamic and imaginative approach to the methodology of Judo training be instituted. Training is improved, not by changing everything a Judo exponent does, but by changing very specific and relatively small details that may consume only a part of his time. In the main, the time-consuming tasks of training will remain. Each practice described in this book is a tool...a tool for training. All trainees and instructors have various tools in their bag of tricks; some have more than others, and almost all could use a few more good substantial ones. The reliance upon bland generalities to mask ignorance of correct training methods is inexcusable. Likewise, the heavy utilization of tools that have become superseded has little or no merit. Perhaps no trainee or instructor is applying in every facet of his learning and teaching the optimum procedural level which is available. To improve upon this situation, it is not necessary to turn everything "topsy-turvy," or to discard. If we can just add one more method of direct value, this makes for improvement and progress. All methods described in this text have been thoroughly studied, developed, and tested in serious Judo training. They have been discussed, compared, and used by the authors throughout the Orient, North, South, and Central America, and Europe. It is our firm conviction that these methods have contributed manifestly toward the general body excellence which produces championship caliber Judo, and the continued optimum level of physical and mental health of the advocates of these exercises. Should this book contribute to general good health and physical fitness of Judo and non-Judo exponents alike, it will have served its intended purpose. It should be especially helpful to all Judo instructors, particularly those of Western Dojo, physical educators, and various athletic coaches in the furtherance of their teachings. These exercises have been extensively used as conditioning exercises for football, basketball, track, swimming, wrestling, boxing, tennis, baseball, and other sports with effective results.

Special acknowledgments are due for the technical assistance given so generously by Y. Matsumoto, Nobuo Nishimori, the instructors and members of The Kodokan Kenshusei, and Allen Clifford; to the Kodokan Judo Institute and Korakuen Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan, the Judo Institute of Maryland and Lipsky's Gymnasium, Baltimore, Maryland, for the use of those facilities; to Isao Inokuma, 1959 All-Japan Judo Champion, who has supported and utilized weight training methods; and to Lanny Miyamoto of Baltimore, Maryland, Robert S. Nishi of Honolulu, Hawaii, and Fred Marianni of Geneva, Switzerland, for their invaluable photographic assistance, all without which this book would not have been possible.

Tokyo, Japan
January, 1962

TAKAHIKO ISHIKAWA
DONN F. DRAEGER

 

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